Why teach music?

Music is a science:
It is exact, specific, and it demands exact acoustics. A conductor’s full score is a chart, a graph which indicates frequencies, intensities, volume changes, melody, and harmony all at once and with the most exact control of time.

Music is mathematical:
It is rhythmically based on the subdivisions of time into fractions which must be done instantaneously, not worked out on paper.

Music is a foreign language:
Most of the terms are in Italian, German, or French; and the notation is certainly not English— but a highly developed kind of shorthand that uses symbols to represent ideas. The semantics of music is the most complete and universal language.

Music is history:
Music usually reflects the environments and times of its creation, often even the country and/or racial feeling.

Music is a physical education:
It requires fantastic coordinations of the fingers, hands, arms, lips, cheek, and facial muscles, in addition to extraordinary dinary control of the diaphragmatic, back, stomach, and chest muscles, which respond instantly to the sound the ear hears and the mind interprets.

Music is all these things, but most of all music is art:
It allows a human being to take all these dry technically boring (but difficult) techniques and use them to create emotion. That is one thing that science cannot duplicate: humanism, feeling, emotion, call it what you will.

This is why we teach music!
Not because we expect you to major in music.
Not because we expect you to play or sing all your life.
Not so you can relax.
Not so you can have fun.
BUT— so you will be human.
So you will recognize beauty.
So you will be sensitive.
So you will be closer to an infinite beyond this world.
So you will have something to cling to.
So you will have more love, more compassion, more gentleness, more good— in short, more life.

Of what value will it be to make a prosperous living unless we know how to live?

That is why we teach music.

Pennsylvania Music Educators’ Association  (via vivaciousviolinist)

(via bratschebaby)

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I have such a fear of finding another like myself, and such a desire to find one. I am so utterly lonely, but I also have such a fear that my isolation be broken through, and I no longer be the head and ruler of my universe.
Anaïs Nin
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caramel-lattte:

perfect
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riskyadventures:

untitled on Flickr.

trinityburn:

So I’m at an old cafe by the beach alone and I got up to use the restroom and buy a croissant. When I returned this was in my book
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I’ve decided,

11:50 pm: If this date doesn’t work out at the end of June, I am becoming a cat lady at 20. Because right now I am drinking wine, busting out my new oil paints, and jamming out to pop rock and there are no fucks to give.

12:02 am: He can cook.

12:20 am He just quoted the Lion King. I won’t need to become a crazy cat lady, he’s perfect.

1:15 am: Also, I’ve finished my bottle of wine, but this has nothing to do with my decision making abilities. Nor does the fact that it’s 1:15 am.

How to relax on a Wednesday night
  1. Instrumental music playlist (via: http://8tracks.com/luvsacoustic/take-me-away or http://8tracks.com/shelteredbeats/how-a-life-might-sound)
  2. Low lighting
  3. Candles (not allowed in Res Halls)
  4. Hour long conversation with my mom that started with me wanting to just tell her that I loved her
  5. Biofreeze and self massage
  6. Sewing
  7. Headphones
Could have found my Noah?

Not Noah from The Notebook. My Noah. My Noah that I have been developing since I was sixteen. The Noah that is a part of me, the part that challenges me to grow because he is somewhere where he doesn’t want to be, and he realizes it and needs that extra step to push him forward. And maybe he’s not my Noah at all, maybe he’s my Rossi. Maybe we’re both Rossi, bustling and full of life, digging away at the hatred and menial tasks of everyday life with our fascination with people and things and they way they interact and think. And our connection with each other and the earth is further engrained through stargazing and not speaking but instead just being and, oh my god, we should just be.

THEME.